Cleaning – Insoluble Contaminants – Particles

A previous blog Cleaning – Soluble Contaminants – “Solvents” described soluble contaminants as those contaminants that can be dissolved using a solvent or engineered liquid such as a surfactant.  Contaminants that are not soluble are the other distinct classification of contaminants.  Sometimes the line between soluble and insoluble is not well defined since there are …

Reader Questions – Monitoring Ultrasonic Transducers

Today’s blog is responding to two questions asked by readers.   Both concern monitoring of ultrasonic transducer performance. Ralph Clendenin asks – “Is there a measurement of the frequency I need to be aware of during “good” operation I can check monthly that would show reduction in cleaning due to change in frequency?” Stephen Sharkey asks – …

Reader Questions – Baskets for Ultrasonic Cleaning

Before we get to today’s topic, we have an announcement!  Many of you may have recently subscribed for email updates of the blog either on your own or as a result of emails sent out by the Cleaning Technologies Group.  The names of those of you who did were entered into a drawing for an ipad (wish I could …

Cleaning – Soluble Contaminants – “Solvents”

In the blog entitled The Lowdown on Dirt, the three basic classes of contaminants were described.  They are – soluble, particulate and a mixture of soluble and particulate.  There are, of course many hybrids and permutations but for purposes of discussing the ultrasonic effect on cleaning we’ll limit to these three for now.  Later on we can …

Reader Question – “PM” of Ultrasonic Equipment

The preceding blog addressed the most common service issue with ultrasonic equipment, the ultrasonic generators, along with Preventive Maintanance measures that can help minimize generator failure events.  Today’s blog will cover additional Preventive Maintenance measures which apply not only to ultrasonic cleaning equipment but to the broader range of cleaning equipment of all types as …

Reader Question – “PM” of Ultrasonic Equipment

      Reader’s Questions The blog welcomes reader’s questions and comments related to cleaning.  Just forward questions or comments to jfuchs@ctgclean.com.  Provided I know the answer to your question, I will either answer it by email or, if the question is of general interest, I will answer it in the blog.  If I don’t know the …

Ultrasonics – Cavitation 101

Cavitation of liquid due to high amplitude ultrasonic vibration within the liquid is the backbone of ultrasonic cleaning.  Liquids have the unique ability to cavitate.  In order to cavitate, a material must exhibit three properties – It must be relatively inextensible and uncompressible.  It can’t be able to stretch or expand or be compressed to significantly change …

Sound – Consequences of Increased Amplitude

Two of the major variables in the production of mechanical vibration are frequency and amplitude.  The consequences of frequency variation were discussed in a preceding blog.  Today’s blog concentrates on amplitude and the power implications of varying either or both frequency and amplitude. As discussed in the blog titled Ultrasonics-Sound-Amplitude, the amplitude of a vibration …