How do you measure surface tension?

In the world of industrial cleaning technology we talk about surface tension a lot! So much so, in fact, that it is hard to enter into any discussion of cleaning without having the subject of surface tension arise.  In cleaning chemistry, for example, we are always looking for lower surface tension to promote penetration of small surface features …

De-Ionized Water – Things I Did(n’t) Know – Part 2

Since DI water quality is critical to many cleaning processes, it is important to understand its behavior.  In too many cases, the quest for numbers results in high costs in the use of DI water.  In short, delivering super-high resistivity water does not always have a significant impact on the resistivity of de-ionized water in the ultimate application. …

Chemical Concentration – Economic and Process Considerations (cont.)

My previous blog addressed the chemical cost of using too much (or perhaps too little) “soap” in a cleaning process based on chemical cost.  Today we look at process issues. You might be saying, “What the heck?  So I use too much chemical.  Soap is cheap and I look at it as “insurance”.”  Well, that “insurance” …

Oil Removal and Management – Oil Coalescer

In the blogs Chemistry – Oil Splitting and Oil Emulsification – Part 1 and Chemistry – Oil Splitting and Oil Emulsification – Part 2, I discussed how oils are removed from parts using chemistry that either splits or emulsifies the oil.  The next step is to collect and get rid of or recycle that removed oil.  This …

What is “Sanitary Plumbing?”

I can think of no term found in specifications for cleaning machines that causes more controversy and confusion than the term “Sanitary Plumbing.”  This term, frequently found in specifications for cleaning and processing systems destined for the semiconductor, medical, food processing and a growing number of other markets is vague and means different things to different industries …