Chemical Concentration – Economic and Process Considerations (cont.)

My previous blog addressed the chemical cost of using too much (or perhaps too little) “soap” in a cleaning process based on chemical cost.  Today we look at process issues. You might be saying, “What the heck?  So I use too much chemical.  Soap is cheap and I look at it as “insurance”.”  Well, that “insurance” …

Chemical Concentration – Economic and Process Considerations

I have talked before on the blog about the subject of chemical concentration and its relationship to cleaning.  A couple of recent incidents prompt me to re-address the subject of chemical concentration but from a little different angle. It’s a “no-brainer” that cleaning chemicals are expensive and, with the possible exception of heat and labor, …

Other Oil Removal Options

In some cases, previously described oil removal technologies based on the gravity separation of oil from the cleaning solution are unjustifiably cumbersome and expensive.  Fortunately, smaller scale solutions are available for use in such applications. Oil Skimmers – Oil skimmers utilize a material which preferentially attracts oil (hydrophobic) to skim floating oil from a surface …

Common Misconceptions About Oil Removal Using Oil Coalescers

Preceding blogs have described oil removal techniques for industrial cleaning in some detail.  It would be nice if this was always a simple consideration – but it is not! The case for using an oil coalescer is pretty clear cut as long as the cleaning chemistry is truly a “splitter” AND, THE OIL IS NOT WATER SOLUBLE.  …

Oil Removal and Management – Oil Coalescer

In the blogs Chemistry – Oil Splitting and Oil Emulsification – Part 1 and Chemistry – Oil Splitting and Oil Emulsification – Part 2, I discussed how oils are removed from parts using chemistry that either splits or emulsifies the oil.  The next step is to collect and get rid of or recycle that removed oil.  This …

Chemistry – Oil Splitting and Oil Emulsification – Part 2

“Splitting” of oil from a surface as described in a preceding blog is a part of nearly any oil removal process. Note – Even cleaning chemistry that is generally classified as an “emulsifier” has ingredients to promote the initial “splitting” of the oil from the surface being cleaned.  These ingredients are often called “surface active …

Chemistry – Oil Splitting and Oil Emulsification – Part 1

As I have said before on this blog, I am not a chemist.  Whatever I say about chemistry on the blog is expressed in layman’s terms and is based on practical experience and not on any deep understanding I have of the properties of chemicals. The usefulness of any information provided here applies only to …

Six Sigma – Monitoring Variables in Cleaning – Part 1

As discussed earlier, monitoring variables in a process is a critical part of Six Sigma.  The following are some examples of parameters that can be monitored in a cleaning process and some suggestions regarding how the monitoring can be done. Chemical Concentration – Chemistry (detergent, acid, rinse aid, etc.) is one of the most important components of the …

What is “Sanitary Plumbing?”

As revealed in the preceding post, the material of construction is a critical factor in the design of “sanitary” plumbing.  Although the selection of material is important, there are other considerations that are equally important in the design of a system that will resist contamination. Surface Finish – Surface finish can have a significant influence …

Chemistry – Tips on Temperature and Concentration

When parts aren’t coming clean two of the first things most process engineers target as potential problems are the temperature and concentration of the chemistry.  These are, in most cases, good bets but one should resist knee-jerk reactions. Chemical Concentration – One of the common knee-jerk reactions to a cleaning problem is to increase chemical …