Chemical Concentration – Economic and Process Considerations (cont.)

My previous blog addressed the chemical cost of using too much (or perhaps too little) “soap” in a cleaning process based on chemical cost.  Today we look at process issues. You might be saying, “What the heck?  So I use too much chemical.  Soap is cheap and I look at it as “insurance”.”  Well, that “insurance” …

Chemical Concentration – Economic and Process Considerations

I have talked before on the blog about the subject of chemical concentration and its relationship to cleaning.  A couple of recent incidents prompt me to re-address the subject of chemical concentration but from a little different angle. It’s a “no-brainer” that cleaning chemicals are expensive and, with the possible exception of heat and labor, …

Cleanliness Testing – White Glove and Swab Tests

I have spent considerable time on the blog disclosing and discussing a variety of cleanliness testing methods.  A couple of tests that escaped earlier discussion, however, are the “white glove” test and the closely-related “swab” test.  These tests are conducted by rubbing or wiping a surface using a white (usually cotton) glove or a cotton …

Common Misconceptions About Oil Removal Using Oil Coalescers

Preceding blogs have described oil removal techniques for industrial cleaning in some detail.  It would be nice if this was always a simple consideration – but it is not! The case for using an oil coalescer is pretty clear cut as long as the cleaning chemistry is truly a “splitter” AND, THE OIL IS NOT WATER SOLUBLE.  …

Chemistry – Oil Splitting and Oil Emulsification – Part 2

“Splitting” of oil from a surface as described in a preceding blog is a part of nearly any oil removal process. Note – Even cleaning chemistry that is generally classified as an “emulsifier” has ingredients to promote the initial “splitting” of the oil from the surface being cleaned.  These ingredients are often called “surface active …

Chemistry – Oil Splitting and Oil Emulsification – Part 1

As I have said before on this blog, I am not a chemist.  Whatever I say about chemistry on the blog is expressed in layman’s terms and is based on practical experience and not on any deep understanding I have of the properties of chemicals. The usefulness of any information provided here applies only to …

Six Sigma – Monitoring Variables in Cleaning – Part 3 (final)

A few more things to monitor – Dirty rinse – An effective rinse is critical to most cleaning processes.  Only in very limited cases can residues from the cleaning step be left on parts after they are cleaned.  It does not, of course, do any good to clean the parts if they become re-contaminated by a …

Ultrasonic Cleaning – Benefits of Agitation

I have written before that there are four major variables we consider in cleaning – – Time, Temperature, Chemistry and Agitation. Based on some recent feedback from the field, however, I guess I need to provide a little more emphasis on the benefits and definition of agitation as it relates specifically to ultrasonic cleaning processes. …

Ultrasonic Cleaning Time – Enough is Enough

In The BIG Four, I talked about the four important variables in cleaning. These are time, temperature, chemistry and agitation. In that blog, I mentioned that a shortcoming in one variable can, to a point, be overcome by changing another of the variables. For example, increasing temperature or changing chemistry may reduce the time required …