Plumbing for High Purity Applications

Just about everyone can recognize the benefits of sterilization to eliminate bio-burden in a plumbing system. Heat or chemicals toxic to living organisms are periodically introduced to kill the offending critters. This process can be conducted using either CIP (Clean In Place) or COP (Clean Out of Place) procedures. CIP simply means cleaning by flushing …

“Sanitary” vs. “High Purity” Plumbing

Previous blogs have addressed what might be called the universal or common requirements for sanitary plumbing. Although obviously important, things like selecting the right materials and surface finishes are only the beginning of designing a system which is compliant with the requirements for a sanitary system as they may be defined by a particular user. …

What is “Sanitary Plumbing?”

As revealed in the preceding post, the material of construction is a critical factor in the design of “sanitary” plumbing.  Although the selection of material is important, there are other considerations that are equally important in the design of a system that will resist contamination. Surface Finish – Surface finish can have a significant influence …

Chemistry – Tips on Temperature and Concentration

When parts aren’t coming clean two of the first things most process engineers target as potential problems are the temperature and concentration of the chemistry.  These are, in most cases, good bets but one should resist knee-jerk reactions. Chemical Concentration – One of the common knee-jerk reactions to a cleaning problem is to increase chemical …

Heat – A Balancing Act

We all know that temperature is an important parameter in cleaning and cleaning-related processes.  Too little and cleaning will be ineffective.  Too much can lead to possible chemical separation, part degradation and loss of ultrasonic cavitation.  So providing the proper temperature is mandatory for the best cleaning result.  Sounds easy?  Well, yes and no – consider …