Heat – A Balancing Act

We all know that temperature is an important parameter in cleaning and cleaning-related processes.  Too little and cleaning will be ineffective.  Too much can lead to possible chemical separation, part degradation and loss of ultrasonic cavitation.  So providing the proper temperature is mandatory for the best cleaning result.  Sounds easy?  Well, yes and no – consider …

Chemistry – Automated Chemical Metering Devices

The chemistries used in industrial cleaning processes are predominantly either dry (granular or powder) or liquid.  Dry chemistries cover a wide range of density and flow characteristics.  In fact, two batches of the “same” dry chemistry may have considerably different properties.  Each liquid product has its own specific gravity and viscosity characteristics but may also vary in other …

Potential Process Problems NOT Related to Cleaning

Most cleaning processes are comprised of a number of discreet steps.  A wash followed by one or more rinses and then a dry would be a typical cleaning process.  As parts being cleaned are moved from one process step to the next, they are vulnerable to potential risks by conditions not directly related to cleaning.  Whether related …

Chemistry – Automatic Chemical Makeup

Previous blogs have revealed a number of ways to measure chemical concentration in a cleaning bath.  It is a logical extension that  process engineers utilize these tools to automate maintaining the proper chemical concentration in their cleaning processes.  Overall, this is a great idea.  However, there are some pitfalls and things that should be taken …

Chemistry – What is Titration?

Titration is a procedure frequently used to measure the chemical concentration in a liquid.  The concept is pretty simple.  A specific volume of the solution under test is collected and put into a container which is usually an erlenmeyer flask or a beaker. The container can be glass, plastic or another material.  Glass is often preferred because …

Lubricants and Coolants – Effectiveness vs. Cleanability

In order for a lubricant or coolant to be effective it must possess the very properties that make it difficult to remove.  In industrial machining, stamping and metal forming applications, selecting lubricants and coolants wisely can greatly simplify cleaning processes required to remove them once these processes are complete. Effective lubricants must be able to adhere …