Cleanliness Testing – White Glove and Swab Tests

I have spent considerable time on the blog disclosing and discussing a variety of cleanliness testing methods.  A couple of tests that escaped earlier discussion, however, are the “white glove” test and the closely-related “swab” test.  These tests are conducted by rubbing or wiping a surface using a white (usually cotton) glove or a cotton …

Common Misconceptions About Oil Removal Using Oil Coalescers

Preceding blogs have described oil removal techniques for industrial cleaning in some detail.  It would be nice if this was always a simple consideration – but it is not! The case for using an oil coalescer is pretty clear cut as long as the cleaning chemistry is truly a “splitter” AND, THE OIL IS NOT WATER SOLUBLE.  …

Oil Removal and Management – Oil Coalescer

In the blogs Chemistry – Oil Splitting and Oil Emulsification – Part 1 and Chemistry – Oil Splitting and Oil Emulsification – Part 2, I discussed how oils are removed from parts using chemistry that either splits or emulsifies the oil.  The next step is to collect and get rid of or recycle that removed oil.  This …

Chemistry – Oil Splitting and Oil Emulsification – Part 2

“Splitting” of oil from a surface as described in a preceding blog is a part of nearly any oil removal process. Note – Even cleaning chemistry that is generally classified as an “emulsifier” has ingredients to promote the initial “splitting” of the oil from the surface being cleaned.  These ingredients are often called “surface active …

Electropolishing

“Electropolishing,” (often shortened to E-P) is a term frequently heard in cleaning circles. Electropolishing of surfaces of cleaning equipment is employed to provide enhanced cosmetic appearance and, more importantly, to enhance their functionality. What is Electropolishing?  – Electropolishing is a lot like electroplating except in reverse. In electropolishing, metal is removed rather than added as …

Ultrasonic Cleaning – Benefits of Agitation

I have written before that there are four major variables we consider in cleaning – – Time, Temperature, Chemistry and Agitation. Based on some recent feedback from the field, however, I guess I need to provide a little more emphasis on the benefits and definition of agitation as it relates specifically to ultrasonic cleaning processes. …

Six Sigma – Process Selection and Monitoring

In order to achieve six sigma results, one must evaluate, measure and statistically control ALL phases of the cleaning process.  A typical cleaning process is comprised of three main stages – – washing, rinsing and drying.  Each of these must be addressed and controlled separately as any one of the three being out of control …

Six Sigma – – The Role of Cleaning

Achieving Six Sigma Capability Parts Washing “Six Sigma” methodology is one of many tools that can be used to improve process efficiency.  The following several blogs are excerpted from an article written by Dale Bowden of the Cleaning Technologies Group and was published in Process Cleaning Magazine.  Mr. Bowden specifically explores the role of cleaning …

Plumbing for High Purity Applications

Just about everyone can recognize the benefits of sterilization to eliminate bio-burden in a plumbing system. Heat or chemicals toxic to living organisms are periodically introduced to kill the offending critters. This process can be conducted using either CIP (Clean In Place) or COP (Clean Out of Place) procedures. CIP simply means cleaning by flushing …