Reader Questions – Monitoring Ultrasonic Transducers

Today’s blog is responding to two questions asked by readers.   Both concern monitoring of ultrasonic transducer performance. Ralph Clendenin asks – “Is there a measurement of the frequency I need to be aware of during “good” operation I can check monthly that would show reduction in cleaning due to change in frequency?” Stephen Sharkey asks – …

Reader Questions – Baskets for Ultrasonic Cleaning

Before we get to today’s topic, we have an announcement!  Many of you may have recently subscribed for email updates of the blog either on your own or as a result of emails sent out by the Cleaning Technologies Group.  The names of those of you who did were entered into a drawing for an ipad (wish I could …

Ultrasonics – Implosion

In the blog Cavitation 101, cavitation in liquids was described as the backbone of ultrasonic cleaning.  Cavitation by itself, however, is not the end of the story.  Although cavitation is the backbone, the real work is accomplished by the implosion of cavitation bubbles. Cavitation bubbles are, in essence, pockets of vacuum or vapor of the surrounding …

Ultrasonics – Cavitation 101

Cavitation of liquid due to high amplitude ultrasonic vibration within the liquid is the backbone of ultrasonic cleaning.  Liquids have the unique ability to cavitate.  In order to cavitate, a material must exhibit three properties – It must be relatively inextensible and uncompressible.  It can’t be able to stretch or expand or be compressed to significantly change …

Sound – Consequences of Increased Amplitude

Two of the major variables in the production of mechanical vibration are frequency and amplitude.  The consequences of frequency variation were discussed in a preceding blog.  Today’s blog concentrates on amplitude and the power implications of varying either or both frequency and amplitude. As discussed in the blog titled Ultrasonics-Sound-Amplitude, the amplitude of a vibration …

Ultrasonics – Consequences of Increased Frequency

In the world of everyday sound, things happen in a fairly predictable way.  Sound vibrations are created, transmitted and received in textbook fashion.  As vibrational frequencies and or amplitudes are increased, however, that picture changes quite dramatically. In earlier blogs, we learned that as the frequency of sound (vibrational energy) is increased, the number of cycles …